Moving on: Elizabethan England

Henry VIIIAfter King Henry’s precious son was finally born, he went on to rule for another 10 years. During this time, his relationship status continued to fluctuate, as his beloved Jane Seymour died just 12 says after Prince Edward was born. Henry went on to marry three more times, although not with the same enthusiasm as before. Henry divorced Anne of Cleves, his first wife after Jane Seymour. The next, Kateryn Howard, was beheaded for adultery. His last wife, Katherine Parr, finally outlived King Henry.

Edward VIHenry had a massive appetite throughout his life. Unfortunately, even when he eventually became less active than he was in his youth, he continued to eat just as much. Over time, King Henry grew and by the time he died, he had a waistline of 110cm and a chest of 145cm.  He had grown so obese that he had to ride horses which were chosen specially for their larger size, and he found moving around his palace increasingly difficult.

Henry eventually had to begin using the closest thing Tudors had to a wheelchair, known as a tramme, and even had to use a rope and pulley system to heave himself up any stairs he encountered. The king died in 1547, at the age of 55. He was buried in Windsor Castle at St. George’s Chapel next to his favourite wife, Jane Seymour (sorry, wives 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6!).

Elizabeth and MaryEdward VI became the next King of England at just 9 years old, but his reign was short-lived. He died at the age of 15, most likely from tuberculosis, in 1553. Edward did not consider Elizabeth or Mary, his two half-sisters, to be legitimate. Instead, he decided to nominate Lady Jane Grey as the next Queen of England. Unfortunately, Jane only got to be queen for nine days before she was proclaimed a traitor and removed by Mary.

Supported by public opinion, Mary became the next Queen of England. Within a year of her coronation, she began to suspect Elizabeth, her younger sister, of plotting against her. Elizabeth was sent to the tower and kept there as a prisoner.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s